Happiness

Yesterday, I was in the car with my mum, dad and sister. We were discussing all sorts of things and my sister brought up a lot of questions to my Mum and Dad about the who was the best behaved child and other random memories. We were discussing something that I can’t even remember, a memory that we were trying to place in the history of our lives. I threw out an age, “Was I about 14?”, and her response was profound and honest – “No, it was when you were happy.”

It got my mind back onto something I’ve been thinking about for a long time – the idea that I’m the happiest I’ve ever been. I can’t recall so many days where I wake up feeling okay and when I don’t, it doesn’t knock me back for weeks. I don’t recall so genuinely content with my life and having legitimate aspirations I can try to achieve. My life isn’t completely ruled by my anxiety but I also know my limits , I know when to push that anxiety and when to leave it. Sitting here writing this I just feel happy. I’ve got the highest grade ever achieved on my college work, I’ve got a job – a fulfilling job that makes me excited to leave the house, and I’ve looked around a University and cannot wait to think about my future there.

I’m genuinely so content that happiness is a realistic possibility everyday. I actually want to leave the house and find myself going crazy if I haven’t left the house before work at 3 o’clock. Now I’ve finished college for the year, I’ve started teaching myself further science because my love of learning is back. I’m comfortable with who I am and I don’t want to hide it, whether that’s emotionally, physically or autistically.

And being so happy just reminds me how grateful I am. Grateful to my family, grateful to my friends, grateful to the medication I take. Grateful that I can live life again when making informed decisions based off my neurotype and my mental health. It’s weird to think that I was so gradually unhappy, but I only noticed it when I experienced the biggest amount of happiness. And that’s why I’m grateful. You can never put things into perspective until you experience something else, and I’m just so glad I can experience this happiness because it means that I will never go back to where it was. It’s too much to lose.

 

The Education System Fails Autistic People

Our education system is fundamentally failing. It failing autistic people, more broadly neurodivergent people and even further, anyone who does not fit the social norms of a typical student, whether that be due to physical or mental health, neurotype or disabilities. I’m not here to blame the teachers, or any individual staff, who do an incredible job on a daily basis – like my mum. I’m here to say the education system system is failing the hundreds of thousands of autistic people in education here in the UK today.

I effectively dropped out of school – attending four half days (three/four hours each) was an absolute miracle. I think in the time I wasn’t attending, the only time I got 5 days in a row was when I had exams. Normal for me was two or three of those, regularly though, it could just be one. That was for about the final year and a half of my compulsory secondary school education. I would come home from those days – sleep, cry, have a meltdown, if not, at the very least, lay down in a dark room for a couple of hours, dreading the next day. I was suffering autistic burnout, feeling utterly depressed and struggling with two anxiety disorders. I couldn’t leave the house, let alone attend my education. My incredibly huge love of learning died for that period. The school system did not fit my autistic needs and I did not have the neurotype for its “one-size-fits-all” philosophy.

This is a weird scenario, right? Surely, it’s just me – at the very least a minority? No.

I know of so many people, autistic people, going through the same struggles as I did. And let’s be perfectly clear – my status as a ‘good’ student with parents willing to fight for me meant I had accommodations made, like half days and a lack of serious consequence from missing school. But others don’t. I know of autistic people who are homeschooled to avoid the anxiety and chaos, I know of autistic people trying as hard as they can to just enter the building and struggling and I know of autistic people who’ve pretty much given up on change, and subsequently their education.

Just living in a world that not made for you is tough enough, but trying to be educated in a system that is so clearly not made for you is a hundred times harder. Schools are too loud, too busy, too complicated, too fast, too chaotic and too full of people. And you’re too small, a singular voice that needs everything to change but the school system can barely imagine the resources, let alone implement them, to help you.

It’s an inflexible and inconsiderate system that I know irritates those – teachers, support staff, teaching assistants and so many more – within in it. They don’t have the power to change this system, despite its clear failures of so many. Some autistic people gain access to accommodations  – which is amazing – but the lack of funding to support the future of a huge community means you have to be deemed to be ‘autistic enough’ first. Autistic people are considered to be ‘outsiders’ and ‘strange’ by most of the world, and despite the unanimous hatred of these terms from autistic communities, when it comes to schooling we’re left alone and deemed to be unworthy of additional support, like any other students. The world, the system and the government should not be using our identities in anyway they want to. You can’t decide we’re unworthy of support and then see our failures as inadequate teaching. You can’t put us in a classroom made for neurotypicals because it’s rare for autistic people to get into specialist education and see us as an issue when we can’t cope and have meltdowns. You can’t pick and choose when you see us as autistic.

The staff within schools try their hardest to help us with the limited time, energy and resources they have and I thank every person who’s tried to accommodate us with what they have. As I said, my mum is teacher and I have incredible amounts of respect for how they try to help us develop as individuals. But because they system is set up for neurotypicals – and we’re seen as a problem from those who’ve never met us but give orders to schools to ensure we achieve everything in inadequate environments for us – the overall impact on autistic people struggling to remain in education is still huge, because the education system – the government and not the teachers – is failing us.

A Somewhat Incoherent Ramble About Struggling

We all struggle sometimes – and that’s completely okay. To admit it, is in fact, even better. But that doesn’t make it easy to do so.

Things have been rough. My physical health is not great and, as always, it’s taken a toll on my mental health. Being hypersensitive to pain doesn’t help, either. It’s weird because this time of year is usually when my mental health gets better, but it’s got worse. I know it’s just stress. I’ve got a lot of assignments to do and everything’s become a bit too much. I walked out of college the other week as a way to try and cope, I’ve been getting home from college and laying in a dark room for a while, crying and melting down more often and I’ve ordered a weighted blanket to help me sleep better, if that’s any indication of how things have been going.

My biggest struggle at the moment is feeling that I’ll burnout again. It’s maybe my biggest fear. I can’t go back to feeling scared to leave the house and leaving my bed a couple of times a week. I’m not there. And I won’t let myself be there again. But it doesn’t change the fact I’m scared.

I think there’s something scary about admitting to struggling when you’re autistic. We’re often told that our lives are struggles and protesting against this becomes normal. It’s ridiculous but I fear that people will change their ideas about me if I say I’m struggling. Something about protesting that I don’t need curing and that I’m never going to be ‘normal’ makes me feel like I shouldn’t say that I’m struggling.

And that’s exactly why I should.

Being honest about this is important for me, but not just internally. Admitting to myself that I’m not doing well is difficult, but telling anyone else is harder and I wish it wasn’t. The stigma around mental health and autism is huge, and helps no one, and combining them together feels hard and scary to break. It’s not though. That’s why this post is shorter and less coherent than usual, but hopefully, I’ll be back on it soon.

I’m not completely okay, and that is completely okay.

The Best Advice I’ve Ever Recieved

Social anxiety has been a part of my life for a really long time. Those constant flashbacks to times I said stupid things that make me want to hide forever. The way I’ve sounded like Siri going wrong when I haven’t known what to say. And that the perpetual fear of social situations, that grew to meaning I didn’t want to go anywhere with people. Those were just facts of life.
These days, I take an antidepressant that helps me feel incredibly neutral. From there, I can have emotions that seem more relative to the individual situation. I don’t lie awake at night thinking about the stupid things I said that day, although that’s probably helped by the sleeping medication. I don’t fear people in general because I know that they will talk at some point in our interaction. Overall, being on that medication has changed my life.
Something else, however, has also made a massive difference to my life. Interestingly enough, it wasn’t therapy or a meeting with a psychiatrist. It was one of the many conversations I had with my former school support worker.
She, in all honesty, it’s probably the reason I’m here today as the person that I am. She listened to everything I had to say and took it on board, finding solutions to every problem I had and helping me at the lowest point in my life. She did so much for me that I still think of the way she did things, the way she help me and the things that she said that have made such a difference to my life.
In one of the long conversations that we had discussing everything about my life, diagnosis and problems I encountered she said something that seems to have changed my life. I was telling her how I found people so confusing and how my social anxiety just made me feel so awkward to the point where I hated every word that came out with mouth. Despite the negativity, I believe I mentioned something about my mind racing and forgetting everything I planned to say, every time I tried to talk. Her response changed everything.
She said “It doesn’t matter if you take a moment to breathe and think about what you’re going to say. No one’s going to make fun of you, in fact you’re just proving that you’re thinking through what you’re saying in an intelligent way. It’s a positive thing.”
I’m not exaggerating when I say that this changed everything. The first day of college I was trying to make friends and I was scared about what to say – everything in my mind went blank, so I paused. After a breath, a whole possibility of things to say swirled around in my mind. I chose one and the conversation moved on. In my job interview I was asked a question that made my mind go completely blank, so I paused. The words came back to me and I took a breath. I found something to say that didn’t make me feel like I was being ridiculous, it made me feel confident in the words that I would say. I could probably even go as far as saying that it helped me get the job.
I will never diminish the impact that the medication I take has had on the way I can communicate with the world around me without feeling like I hate myself. But I know it’s not just the medication. Sometimes, words of simple reassurance and basic advice can change the way someone thinks, and in turn, their life.

My Sensory Box

IMG_2891I have a box that resides in a drawer. It’s my last stop before leaving the house on a rough sensory day. It’s my first stop when I find my hands itching to fiddle or messing with something that could be more dangerous. It contains things to occupy my hands, pretty colours to colours look at and earplugs for the louder days. Perhaps it is is best described as a coping mechanism. For those days when everything is too much or not enough, and every kind of sensory input is wrong. Or just for the days when I need the passively stim. It sometimes comes in the form of a black make-up bag when I’m on the go – but mainly, it is my sensory box.

Stimming is such a natural part of life as an autistic person and stim toys are tools that help me slim differently. Sometimes they actually things designed to help me, and sometimes their objects are required over the past few years that have helped me anyway.

Tangles are one of my favourite in toys that exists. In the picture at the top of this post there are three, technically four. They are the chains of plastic that make a great tools to fiddle with. The pink, blue, yellow and clear coloured one is textured on the outside, which helps me out on days when I’m more prone to scratching. They provide a tougher form of sensory input that’s not dangerous at all. The blue, yellow, green and clear one is also texted that I’ve got more of a squishy outer coating that provides a drastically different but also great kind of input. The metallic pink one is closer to the standard kind of tango, as it is smooth all over. Lastly, the deep blue chain in the picture is made up of tangle parts, I find it good to loop around my finger and stim with. As stim toys go, tangles about very discreet and pretty commonplace. There’s a reason I’ve got so many!

Chewellery – or chewable jewellery – is also a major important thing for me. It stops me grinding my teeth and biting things like the caps of pens and sometimes my hands. They’re made of food grade silicone, which means they’re safe to chew. The picture shows two of them- I have two identical dulcimer pendants from the amazing stim toy shop stimtastic. The pendants are designed for lighter chewers, and as my chewing has become a little more aggressive, I use two at once. They’re a little bit more of a discreet way to chew than other chewable items, and so far no one’s really questioned me on it.

Those are probably my most used sensory tools, but the picture shows a lot more. I have the somewhat universally recognised fidget cube (which is now looking a little bit dirty from its use), a smiley popper toy that’s good for some resistance, a toy that I have no idea what it’s called but it’s basically a bit of purple mesh with marble inside, a couple of different spiky things that can be pulled instead of my hair, ear plugs for when things get too loud and a couple of other bits too.

And there we have my sensory toys and tools that I use to cope with tough sensory days and they need to passively stim. Hopefully by the time you’re reading this, it’s April and marks the beginning of my (hopefully) two monthly posts. I’m going to try and post a little more regularly about a variety of things, let’s hope I can stick to it this time!

Labels: Why They’re Great

Up until the age of 15, I didn’t like myself very much. I thought of myself as ‘awkward’ and ‘weird’ in a way I couldn’t explain. Physical appearance hadn’t overly bothered me throughout my life but who I was inside had. I’d always felt different to my brother and sister, but growing older meant I felt different to everyone. I desperately wanted not to care but from the age of thirteen onward I was researching everything I could. Like physical and mental health conditions, hoping something would apply to me and someone could tell me what on earth was going on. The answer hadn’t really crossed my mind. By when, in the diagnostic appointment, they said “we think you’re autistic”, I was beyond relieved.

I’m autistic, not ‘weird’. A simple word summing up my entire life was all I needed. I’m not limited by a word that has given me the chance to live a proper life again. I can make friends and go “I’m Emma and I’m autistic, ask me questions if you want, I’m just telling you who I am”. I can get a job, telling my future boss “I’m autistic, and I want to help people learn, especially people who’ve struggled with understanding the world like me” (true story!).  I can tell the world “I’m autistic and I couldn’t care less if you look down on me for that. If you want to look down on me, get out of my life.” Most of all, I can leave the house being me, flapping my arms and not caring, if I want to. I’m not hiding who I am, because the effort it took caused a burnout-breakdown I never want to see repeated.

Not only that, but saying “I’m autistic!” or “I have anxiety disorders!” are, to me, useful descriptors that tells you who I am in a concise way. It’s way easier to say “I’m autistic” than “I flap my hands sometimes, can have vicious meltdowns, can’t communicate brilliantly, don’t understand social norms and codes, am hypersensitive to pretty much everything and have only seemed to talk about Harry Potter for the past six years”.

There’s this idea that labels limit you. I’ve had conversations before where I’ve even been talking about how much I love labels, only to be told “but, you don’t want to limit yourself, you’re not just autistic.” Not only does my life revolve around being autistic (more on this in my Language: Identity vs Person post) but I love the fact I’m am who I am. Being autistic isn’t limiting, a lack of support is.

I didn’t have support for the first 15 years of my life, and I hated myself.  Having a label, and the access to support that it brings, helped me learn to love who I am. How – in anyway at all – is that limiting? I’m the happiest I’ve ever been in my life. And yes, to some people, labels seem ridiculous. They seem limiting and harsh and unnecessary. But I wear my labels like they’re my favourite clothes, and I’ve never felt more comfortable in my own skin.

Blog Update

Welcome to my updated blog!

I’ve decided it was time for a change. When I started this blog, I chose the first name that resonated with me – ProudlyAutistic – and while it still does, I wanted to expand a little. Organised Chaos describes my life in general, and means I can broaden my post range. I’ll still be posting my autism posts, but I also want to venture out more into mental health posts, along with other ideas I’ve been having!

It’s the same blog, just with a different name, and perhaps a slightly different direction at times. Thanks for all your support so far,

Emma