Labels: Why They’re Great

Up until the age of 15, I didn’t like myself very much. I thought of myself as ‘awkward’ and ‘weird’ in a way I couldn’t explain. Physical appearance hadn’t overly bothered me throughout my life but who I was inside had. I’d always felt different to my brother and sister, but growing older meant I felt different to everyone. I desperately wanted not to care but from the age of thirteen onward I was researching everything I could. Like physical and mental health conditions, hoping something would apply to me and someone could tell me what on earth was going on. The answer hadn’t really crossed my mind. By when, in the diagnostic appointment, they said “we think you’re autistic”, I was beyond relieved.

I’m autistic, not ‘weird’. A simple word summing up my entire life was all I needed. I’m not limited by a word that has given me the chance to live a proper life again. I can make friends and go “I’m Emma and I’m autistic, ask me questions if you want, I’m just telling you who I am”. I can get a job, telling my future boss “I’m autistic, and I want to help people learn, especially people who’ve struggled with understanding the world like me” (true story!).  I can tell the world “I’m autistic and I couldn’t care less if you look down on me for that. If you want to look down on me, get out of my life.” Most of all, I can leave the house being me, flapping my arms and not caring, if I want to. I’m not hiding who I am, because the effort it took caused a burnout-breakdown I never want to see repeated.

Not only that, but saying “I’m autistic!” or “I have anxiety disorders!” are, to me, useful descriptors that tells you who I am in a concise way. It’s way easier to say “I’m autistic” than “I flap my hands sometimes, can have vicious meltdowns, can’t communicate brilliantly, don’t understand social norms and codes, am hypersensitive to pretty much everything and have only seemed to talk about Harry Potter for the past six years”.

There’s this idea that labels limit you. I’ve had conversations before where I’ve even been talking about how much I love labels, only to be told “but, you don’t want to limit yourself, you’re not just autistic.” Not only does my life revolve around being autistic (more on this in my Language: Identity vs Person post) but I love the fact I’m am who I am. Being autistic isn’t limiting, a lack of support is.

I didn’t have support for the first 15 years of my life, and I hated myself.  Having a label, and the access to support that it brings, helped me learn to love who I am. How – in anyway at all – is that limiting? I’m the happiest I’ve ever been in my life. And yes, to some people, labels seem ridiculous. They seem limiting and harsh and unnecessary. But I wear my labels like they’re my favourite clothes, and I’ve never felt more comfortable in my own skin.

2 thoughts on “Labels: Why They’re Great

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