My Sensory Box

IMG_2891I have a box that resides in a drawer. It’s my last stop before leaving the house on a rough sensory day. It’s my first stop when I find my hands itching to fiddle or messing with something that could be more dangerous. It contains things to occupy my hands, pretty colours to colours look at and earplugs for the louder days. Perhaps it is is best described as a coping mechanism. For those days when everything is too much or not enough, and every kind of sensory input is wrong. Or just for the days when I need the passively stim. It sometimes comes in the form of a black make-up bag when I’m on the go – but mainly, it is my sensory box.

Stimming is such a natural part of life as an autistic person and stim toys are tools that help me slim differently. Sometimes they actually things designed to help me, and sometimes their objects are required over the past few years that have helped me anyway.

Tangles are one of my favourite in toys that exists. In the picture at the top of this post there are three, technically four. They are the chains of plastic that make a great tools to fiddle with. The pink, blue, yellow and clear coloured one is textured on the outside, which helps me out on days when I’m more prone to scratching. They provide a tougher form of sensory input that’s not dangerous at all. The blue, yellow, green and clear one is also texted that I’ve got more of a squishy outer coating that provides a drastically different but also great kind of input. The metallic pink one is closer to the standard kind of tango, as it is smooth all over. Lastly, the deep blue chain in the picture is made up of tangle parts, I find it good to loop around my finger and stim with. As stim toys go, tangles about very discreet and pretty commonplace. There’s a reason I’ve got so many!

Chewellery – or chewable jewellery – is also a major important thing for me. It stops me grinding my teeth and biting things like the caps of pens and sometimes my hands. They’re made of food grade silicone, which means they’re safe to chew. The picture shows two of them- I have two identical dulcimer pendants from the amazing stim toy shop stimtastic. The pendants are designed for lighter chewers, and as my chewing has become a little more aggressive, I use two at once. They’re a little bit more of a discreet way to chew than other chewable items, and so far no one’s really questioned me on it.

Those are probably my most used sensory tools, but the picture shows a lot more. I have the somewhat universally recognised fidget cube (which is now looking a little bit dirty from its use), a smiley popper toy that’s good for some resistance, a toy that I have no idea what it’s called but it’s basically a bit of purple mesh with marble inside, a couple of different spiky things that can be pulled instead of my hair, ear plugs for when things get too loud and a couple of other bits too.

And there we have my sensory toys and tools that I use to cope with tough sensory days and they need to passively stim. Hopefully by the time you’re reading this, it’s April and marks the beginning of my (hopefully) two monthly posts. I’m going to try and post a little more regularly about a variety of things, let’s hope I can stick to it this time!

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